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Tennis injuries

With the Wimbledon championships now underway, we see the tennis courts fill up with people renewing their enjoyment of the game.  Just like with any other activity, playing a game of puts you at a higher risk of injuries.  Tennis is a high energy, stop-start game, with sudden bursts of speed in different directions, repetitive movements, jumping, big swings and high impact shots.  All of these actions have the potential to cause an injury.

Simple advice to help prevent injuries in tennis is to wear trainers designed for tennis, and to use a tennis racket that is the right size for you (as a general rule, when holding a tennis racket in a forehand grip, you just should just about be able to squeeze a finger from the other hand into the small space in between your fingers, and the base of your thumb).  A good warm up with a gentle walk into jog followed by dynamic stretching of all the key joints and muscles to be used will lessen the chance of some injuries, and static stretching after the game will help too. 

If you do find yourself in pain, either during or after a game of tennis, our quick guide of the most common (but not exhaustive) list of injuries we typically see from tennis are shown below:

Shoulder injuries

The shoulder is a very mobile joint that allows us to move our arm in full in almost full circles in all directions.  The shoulder muscles have a poor blood supply meaning that the body's pain receptors do not always translate the injury until it has become more serious.  It also means that once injured, recovery times can be poor.  Working on your shoulder strength and mobility if you are a keen tennis player will help keep you injury free. 

If you notice pain whilst playing, or after playing tennis it is possible you could have one of the following conditions:

Elbow and arm:

Tendons in the elbows and wrist can become aggravated due to gripping the racket and the repetitive nature of tennis means the muscles and tendons can become over-used and injured.  Choosing a racket that fits your grip is important to prevent injury, and try and release your grip in between shots to give your muscles and tendons a brief respite.  Common injuries of the arm from tennis include:

Knees:

The knees come under strain during a game of tennis, with the sudden changes in direction, jumping and repetitive movements.  If you suddenly increase the amount of work your knee joint, and surrounding tendons and muscles have to do,e.g. if you suddenly play a few hours of tennis when you haven't done so since last year, you will put them at more risk of injury.  For more serious tennis players, keeping the muscles around your knee flexible and strong will help keep some injuries at bay.

Ankles and calf:

 

If you have an injury from tennis, and would like treatment and advice please contact our friendly team at The StoneHouse Clinic, Hartham Park, Corsham (near Chippenham and Bath) by clicking here

 

 

 

 

   

 

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